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KW Commercial Texas Gulf has served the Greater Houston area for over 20 years with exceptional commercial real estate leasing, commercial real estate sales, and real estate investing. If you are looking for office space, land development, investment property, new industrial space, or tenant representation, our experts will be glad to assist you. Our dedicated professionals know the commercial market in the Houston area and beyond and are here to service our clients needs. We look forward to assisting you in locating your ideal business location for taking your business to the next level!

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Contact KW Commercial Texas Gulf for Commercial Property For Lease, Commercial Property For Sale, Commercial Real Estate, Commercial Real Estate Companies, Investment Property, Land, Land For Sale, Leasing, Office Space, Office Space For Rent, Properties, Real Estate, Real Estate Companies, Real Estate Investing, Real Estate Websites, and Realtors. Proudly supporting the areas of Baytown, Beaumont, Conroe, Freeport, Galveston, Houston, Katy, Kingwood, La Porte, Pasadena, Pearland, Richmond, Sugar Land, The Woodlands, and surrounding areas.

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Contact KW Commercial Texas Gulf for Commercial Property For Lease in La Porte, Commercial Property For Sale in La Porte, Commercial Real Estate in La Porte, Commercial Real Estate Companies in La Porte, Investment Property in La Porte, Land in La Porte, Land For Sale in La Porte, Leasing in La Porte, Office Space in La Porte, Office Space For Rent in La Porte, Properties in La Porte, Real Estate in La Porte, Real Estate Companies in La Porte, Real Estate Investing in La Porte, Real Estate Websites in La Porte, Realtors in La Porte, and in surrounding areas.

Below is some general information about La Porte:

La Porte is a city in Harris County, Texas, United States, within the Bay Area of the HoustonÐSugar LandÐBaytown metropolitan area. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 33,800. La Porte is the fourth largest incorporated city in Harris County. When La Porte celebrated its centennial in 1992, it was the home of Barbours Cut Terminal, operated by the Port of Houston Authority since 1977. 15 years later, the Port of Houston’s newest addition, Bayport, was established just south of La Porte. Thus the area around La Porte has served an increasingly important role in international trade since the 1970s. The area around modern La Porte gained fame early in Texas history as the location of the Battle of San Jacinto on April 21, 1836, which ended the Texas Revolution, establishing the independence of the Republic of Texas from Mexico. The San Jacinto Monument, in the unincorporated area of La Porte, commemorates the battle. During the early 20th century, particularly the 1920s and 1930s, La Porte’s Sylvan Beach became a nationally known tourist destination attracting some of the nation’s most well-known entertainers. As a result of changing economics in the Houston area and beach erosion the tourist business declined while industrial development in the area grew. During World War II and afterward La Porte’s economy rapidly re-oriented toward petroleum/petrochemicals and shipping, which developed as the dominant industries in the Pasadena-Baytown area.

The community of La Porte was founded in 1892 as a speculative real estate venture by an investment group. A 22-acre public space known as Sylvan Grove was reserved by the waterfront. The area around Sylvan Grove soon gained amenities including bathhouses, boating piers, and a Victorian hotel with a dance pavilion. La Porte quickly became the most popular tourist destination in the Houston area. Sylvan Grove Park was acquired in 1896 by a company known as Adoue and Lobit and renamed Sylvan Beach. Cottage retreats were built around the waterfront. In 1900 a devastating hurricane hit the shoreline seriously damaging the community’s attractions. As the Texas Oil Boom took hold beginning in 1901, and neighboring Houston became home to many wealthy businessmen, La Porte quickly rebuilt and re-established itself as a tourist center. It was, however, damaged again by a major fire and another hurricane in 1915. The community rebuilt yet again. During the 1920s and 1930s Sylvan Beach Amusement Park became a nationally recognized destination featuring beauty contests and regular performances by famous bands in addition to a growing gallery of amenities. Some of the most well-known performers of the era, including Guy Lombardo, the Dorsey Brothers, Phil Harris, and Benny Goodman, appeared at the park. In the 1930s the park was completely revamped adding a large boardwalk, amusement rides, and many other attractions. The community remained small, supported exclusively by Sylvan Beach tourism and the nearby Bay Ridge community, an area of beachfront summer homes in neighboring Morgan’s Point built by wealthy Houstonians.

The beachfront began to physically shrink beginning around 1928 because of erosion from the wakes of shipping traffic, and land subsidence resulting from the extraction of groundwater in the area. Gas rationing in World War II slowed tourism. A hurricane in 1943 managed to destroy most of the tourist attractions. Most of the damaged structures at Sylvan Beach were never rebuilt after this time, and La Porte’s tourist industry rapidly declined. By the later 20th century erosion had completely eliminated the beach itself. As shipyards and industrial plants in World War II were developed in nearby communities such as Pasadena, Baytown, and Deer Park, the community’s residents became more dependent on these businesses. The opening of the La Porte-Baytown tunnel in 1954 further spurred development. The later establishment of the Johnson Space Center in the nearby Clear Lake Area, the Barbours Cut shipping terminal in neighboring Morgan’s Point, and the Bayport Industrial District within La Porte’s jurisdiction have gradually made the community successful as part of the Houston area’s industrial heartland. Much of the history of La Porte’s glory years as a tourist haven has been preserved by the La Porte Bay Area Heritage Society. Plans have been discussed for many years to restore La Porte’s status as a tourist destination. A project to restore the beachfront at Sylvan Beach Park began in 2009. Other plans including building a large hotel on the shoreline have been discussed as well.

Jennie Reid Elementary, Rizzuto Elementary, Lomax Elementary, La Porte Elementary, Bayshore Elementary, College Park Elementary, and Heritage Elementary. The secondary schools include Baker Sixth Grade Campus, La Porte Junior High, Lomax Junior High and La Porte High School. The area is zoned to the La Porte Independent School District, including La Porte High School. The city is served by the 23,357-square-foot La Porte Branch Library of Harris County Public Library, located at 600 South Broadway. The library first opened in 1929. The City of La Porte maintains the buildings and furnishings while HCPL staffs and operates the library.

The city sits adjacent to three major economic hubs of the Bay Area and Greater Houston: the Bayport Industrial District, the Battleground Industrial District, and the Barbours Cut shipping terminal. Harris County Transit provides public transportation in La Porte. La Porte Municipal Airport is located in the La Porte city limits. The closest major airports with commercial airline service are William P. Hobby Airport and George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston. La Porte is linked to Interstate 10 by State Highway 146, crossing the Fred Hartman Bridge into the nearby city of Baytown; the bridge was built in 1995, replacing the Baytown Tunnel, to allow deepening of the Houston Ship Channel. La Porte is located on the northwest end of Galveston Bay at the mouth of Buffalo Bayou and the San Jacinto River.

Source: La Porte on Wikipedia